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 Cerambycidae Lamiinae
 Mesosini
 Sulawesi: Cacia sp.
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Vitali
Member Rosalia

Estonia
735 Posts

Posted - 13/02/2011 :  20:50:48  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote


The pattern reminds C. interrupteovittata, but this beetle comes from Sulawesi, Indonesia.
This species completes Cacia invasion here at Forum.

Edited by - Xavier on 22/11/2017 14:26:05

Francesco
Forum Admin

Luxembourg
8230 Posts

Posted - 14/02/2011 :  09:58:57  Show Profile  Email Poster  Visit Francesco's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Cacia (Corethrophora) vanikorensis Boisduval, 1835, a very characteristic species that Boisduval described from unknown locality.
He was uncertain among Vanikoro (Solomon Is.), New Guinea or Sulawesi. .. but he selected a wrong name, since this species is endemic from Sulawesi
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Pierre
Member Rosenbergia

Switzerland
1164 Posts

Posted - 17/02/2011 :  07:15:06  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote

Totally out of topic, but fascinating though: what a stunning convergence with the colouration of eastern Asian Anthribidae!
Genus Xenocerus.
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Francesco
Forum Admin

Luxembourg
8230 Posts

Posted - 17/02/2011 :  13:36:45  Show Profile  Email Poster  Visit Francesco's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very interesting topic!
According to me, this is the proof that insect colours can not be only explained by Batesian-Müllerian or cryptic mimicry.
This pattern has to nothing do with colour either of trees or of dangerous species... nonetheless, it is singularly similar in order to be considered a case.
My professor of zoology sustained that particular viruses could detach parts of the DNA from their hosts and insert them in the DNA of new hosts during the contagion. If these parts managed to codify pattern or other characteristics, this could explain because not philogenetically related animals have singularly similar structures.
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Vitali
Member Rosalia

Estonia
735 Posts

Posted - 17/02/2011 :  14:39:28  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
The latter explanation seems very attractive.
We learn a lot about mimicry of dangerous insects like wasps for instance, but it has been always fascinating to see Doliops mimicking Pachyrrhynchus. Is there any real profit for Doliops? It is hard to believe that only the hardness of Pachyrrhynchus' chitin is decisive in this case.
An absolutely stunning example of such mimicry can be seen at the ebay listing of 5 bugs now, where Doliops basilana is shown with the corresponding Pachyrrhynchus species (hurry to see, only 2 days to the end).
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Xavier
Scientific Collaborator

France
9077 Posts

Posted - 20/11/2017 :  13:16:39  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote

154.42 KB
Cacia (Corethrophora) vanikorensis (Boisduval, 1835)
This is the original drawing. I do not think that Vitali species is the same.
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Vitali
Member Rosalia

Estonia
735 Posts

Posted - 21/11/2017 :  13:57:36  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
Does anyone have Schwarzer Bernhard, 1926, Beiträge zur Kenntnis der Cerambyciden (Col.). Entomologische Mitteilungen, Berlin 15 (1): 6-14, where C. ligatoides was described from Sulawesi?
That species was later recognized as a synonym of C. vanikorensis.
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Xavier
Scientific Collaborator

France
9077 Posts

Posted - 21/11/2017 :  18:37:05  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote

145.79 KB
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Xavier
Scientific Collaborator

France
9077 Posts

Posted - 21/11/2017 :  19:07:38  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
I think your species is closer to this one described from Sulawesi :

104.27 KB
Cacia (Ipocregyes) monstrabilis Heller, 1916 HT
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Vitali
Member Rosalia

Estonia
735 Posts

Posted - 22/11/2017 :  08:50:37  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
Wow, Xavier! If you even haven't arrived at the destination, it is very close. Thank you.
Do you know how to distinguish Corethrophora from Ipocregyes?
By the way, there are photos of C. vanikorensis at Larry's site. These are really different.

Edited by - Vitali on 22/11/2017 08:51:00
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Xavier
Scientific Collaborator

France
9077 Posts

Posted - 22/11/2017 :  12:24:42  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote

26.62 KB
from Breuning(1939)

3rd antennomera large at the apex...Sub.gen. Corethrophora Blanch.
- 3rd antennomera no large or slightly enlarged et the apex....sub. gen. Ipocregyes Pasc.
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Vitali
Member Rosalia

Estonia
735 Posts

Posted - 22/11/2017 :  13:22:05  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
Yes, I also found this in Gressit’s Cerambycidae of China.

If so, there are several consequences:
1) my beetle should belong to Corethrophora;
2) one of the beetles shown for C. vanikorensis in Larry’s site presents a different species;
3) according to the drawing C. monstrabilis Heller, 1916 should belong to Corethrophora.

Is the third antennomere thickened also in females?

Edited by - Vitali on 22/11/2017 13:24:38
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